Big George Foreman

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Big George Foreman

Duggerman
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Here are some of my thoughts on Big George, courtesy of a blog I wrote a while back.

Big George Foreman is another all time great. His punching power was frightening. He won the heavyweight title by easily destroying Joe Frazier in two rounds. He then gave Ken Norton a similar beating. But, he lost his status as an invincible fighter when he was KO'd by Muhammad Ali in 1974. He retired after another shocking loss; this time to Jimmy Young in 1977. George became a born-again Christian after that fight and started preaching. Incredibly, he returned to the ring in 1987 and won the heavyweight title again by knocking out Michael Moorer in 1994, exactly 20 years after losing it to Ali. (He even wore the same trunks, mind you.)

Ironically, I think the old version of George Foreman is more dangerous than the prime one. Young George had stamina problems (something exploited by Ali) and threw wild, looping punches that could be countered. The older George didn't have these issues. He developed a heavy jab reminiscent of his idol, Sonny Liston. His punches were now short and compact. He even put together effective combinations. Remarkably, he was never knocked off his feet during his second career. The mature George surprised many people by giving Tommy Morrison, Shannon Briggs and Evander Holyfield a lot of trouble in their primes. I suggest watching Foreman's fight with Ron Lyle on youtube. Both men hit the canvas several times. Lots of action. Probably the most exciting fight since Jack Dempsey-Luis Firpo.
I bolded one sentence of this because I'm one of the few people I know who holds this belief.

Here is a link to the blog, so you can read what I wrote about the other fighters.

http://ajdugger.weebly.com/1/post/2011/06/aj-duggers-list-of-the-top-ten-greatest-heavyweight-boxers-of-all-time.html

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Re: Big George Foreman

Shane
You got it right. George was dominant on the scene until he lost to Ali. After Zaire, he was yesterday's news. But George could punch like the son of a gun. He's one of the best boxers ever but people penalize him for succumbing to Ali genius.
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Re: Big George Foreman

Maximillian
In reply to this post by Duggerman
Duggerman wrote
Ironically, I think the old version of George Foreman is more dangerous than the prime one. Young George had stamina problems (something exploited by Ali) and threw wild, looping punches that could be countered. The older George didn't have these issues. He developed a heavy jab reminiscent of his idol, Sonny Liston. His punches were now short and compact. He even put together effective combinations. Remarkably, he was never knocked off his feet during his second career. The mature George surprised many people by giving Tommy Morrison, Shannon Briggs and Evander Holyfield a lot of trouble in their primes.
I halfway agree that old George was better than young George. Everything you said was valid, but George fought the right guys in his second career. He fought guys who came forward. Michael Moorer was an idiot for planting himself in front of George, but that's what George wanted. Evander Holyfield and Tommy Morrison were foolish to stand in front of George too, but they didn't constantly stay in his reach. They mixed it up, but they took some hard punches. I agree that young George was easy to counter, but it's risky. If he hits you once, it's over.

GIFSoup
"Take that, Big George!! I'mma BAAAD MAAN!! I shook up the world!!! I'm pretty!!!!"
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Re: Big George Foreman

Duggerman
Administrator
Young George had stamina issues, threw wild looping punches, and had a more vulnerable chin at times. He was decked by Ali, Lyle and Young. I agree that he was still a highly dangerous fighter in his prime, but some of the other great champs of the past would have taken advantage of his flaws.
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Re: Big George Foreman

Zorro
Not too many people would beat George at his best. Muhammad Ali, Joe Louis and Sonny Liston are my only picks. Maybe, maybe prime Mike Tyson.
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Re: Big George Foreman

Duggerman
Administrator
Zorro wrote
Not too many people would beat George at his best. Muhammad Ali, Joe Louis and Sonny Liston are my only picks. Maybe, maybe prime Mike Tyson.
Agreed. Jack Dempsey has a shot, too. He would circle Foreman and only attack when he saw an opening. He had the speed and the punch to really hurt George.
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Re: Big George Foreman

Evan Fields
George had issues with the movers and shakers. I think Larry Holmes would have taken him, too.
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Re: Big George Foreman

Zorro
The Gr8 One wrote
George had issues with the movers and shakers.
No he didn't. George only failed miserably against Jimmy Young because he tried to pace himself. After Zaire George became obsessed with never running out of gas again. That's why i think Ali would have beat him in a rematch. George would try to pace himself and Ali would outbox him. Prime George Foreman from 1968-1974 was a monster who lacked stamina but was a freaking animal.

George changed his style tremendously when he came back to boxing in 1987. I was one of many that didn't take him seriously. I remember laughing about it. George was fat and looked like a joke. But when he knocked out Gerry Cooney, I sat up. Cooney was a good fighter. When George almost beat Evander Holyfield for the title, he earned my respect but I didn't think he'd ever win the belt again. He shocked the world when he knocked out Michael Moorer for the WBA championship in '94. I'll never forget that night. I watched it with some friends and none of us gave George a chance especially since he was getting pounded on until the sudden knockout.
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Re: Big George Foreman

Duggerman
Administrator
There were three versions of George Foreman as a fighter.

1968-74: The ruthless, wham-bam-don't-give-a-damn fighter that clubbed everyone to death. He cut the ring down pretty well and had a good chin. Trained by the legendary knockout artist Archie Moore and Dick Saddler, Foreman looked unstoppable until Muhammad Ali exposed his one weakness..stamina.

1975-77: This version of George Foreman was somewhat of a "teenage" stage. He was insecure and afraid to waste a punch or sap his strength. Therefore, he held back and was afraid to launch big knockout shots. This was the worst version of Foreman, although he put on a great show with Ron Lyle. I have no doubt in my mind that Muhammad Ali would have outsmarted this version of George Foreman.

1987-1997: In my opinion, this was the best version of Foreman. He was slow, overweight and old, but he developed a heavy Sonny Liston jab, threw combinations, and shortened up his punches. He wasn't throwing the wild, looping punches of the 1970s. He wisely set up brutal knockouts and his chin improved. He was never knocked down during his second career and was rarely hurt, taking the best from prime Holyfield, Morrison and Briggs.
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Re: Big George Foreman

Zorro
I had forgotten about George's fight with Bert Cooper. Bert Cooper was an animal and was trained by Joe Frazier. But he quit after two rounds in his fight with George. Since Bert was a copycat of Joe Frazier, this makes me think that Joe Frazier may have not been a match for old Foreman either. Here is the fight. Bert could really punch, but George stopped him and early.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xj_TRKvtgfg

You have to give it up to George Foreman. He's an all time great.
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Re: Big George Foreman

Duggerman
Administrator
A win over a much faster and younger opponent like Bert Cooper is very impressive from where I sit.
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Re: Big George Foreman

Zombies Ate Me
In reply to this post by Zorro
Zorro wrote

George changed his style tremendously when he came back to boxing in 1987. I was one of many that didn't take him seriously. I remember laughing about it. George was fat and looked like a joke. But when he knocked out Gerry Cooney, I sat up. Cooney was a good fighter. When George almost beat Evander Holyfield for the title, he earned my respect but I didn't think he'd ever win the belt again. He shocked the world when he knocked out Michael Moorer for the WBA championship in '94. I'll never forget that night. I watched it with some friends and none of us gave George a chance especially since he was getting pounded on until the sudden knockout.
George looked even better than he really was because he fought guys that came at him. If you fight guys that are right for your style, you can't go wrong. Can you really picture old Foreman beating prime Lennox Lewis or even someone like Riddick Bowe or Andrew Golota? I can't.
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Re: Big George Foreman

Rosco
In reply to this post by Duggerman
Duggerman wrote
There were three versions of George Foreman as a fighter.

1968-74: The ruthless, wham-bam-don't-give-a-damn fighter that clubbed everyone to death. He cut the ring down pretty well and had a good chin. Trained by the legendary knockout artist Archie Moore and Dick Saddler, Foreman looked unstoppable until Muhammad Ali exposed his one weakness..stamina.

1975-77: This version of George Foreman was somewhat of a "teenage" stage. He was insecure and afraid to waste a punch or sap his strength. Therefore, he held back and was afraid to launch big knockout shots. This was the worst version of Foreman, although he put on a great show with Ron Lyle. I have no doubt in my mind that Muhammad Ali would have outsmarted this version of George Foreman.

1987-1997: In my opinion, this was the best version of Foreman. He was slow, overweight and old, but he developed a heavy Sonny Liston jab, threw combinations, and shortened up his punches. He wasn't throwing the wild, looping punches of the 1970s. He wisely set up brutal knockouts and his chin improved. He was never knocked down during his second career and was rarely hurt, taking the best from prime Holyfield, Morrison and Briggs.
Great post, champ
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Re: Big George Foreman

Entaowed
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Re: Big George Foreman

Zorro
Entaowed wrote
young George had an undefeated record fighting the best during the Golden Age of boxing?
If my memory is correct, young George was not undefeated because he lost to Muhammad Ali.


<br />GIFSoup

And he lost to Jimmy Young before retiring in 1977.

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And he had to get off the floor twice against Ron Lyle.
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Re: Big George Foreman

Entaowed
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Re: Big George Foreman

the boston strong boy
In reply to this post by Duggerman
his style he used when he was older was much better if he did that style when he was younger ali might not have won
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Re: Big George Foreman

Kid Dynamite
In reply to this post by Entaowed
Entaowed wrote
I am going by the post right above, where young George is defined by '68-'74.  Ali out boxed him on a bad night for George, great strategies, & loose rings.  George later said he was given some drug/medicine.
Regardless, all agree his peak was before this fight, & absolute peak '72-'74.
I don't buy that bullshit about George being drugged. He was looking for all kinds of excuses for losing. He really believed in his heart that he was unbeatable. He expected to make quick work of Muhammad Ali but was in for the shock of his life.

I also disagree that George was not at his peak when he fought Ali. He was at his best, just got outsmarted by the greatest fighter of all time. Nothing wrong with that.
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Re: Big George Foreman

Entaowed
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Re: Big George Foreman

Duggerman
Administrator
George was one scary man in his prime. He scared the crap out of this reporter!!! lol.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c29-5PqJuG4

"I beg your pardon?" lol.

I would not want to interview Prime Foreman or Mike Tyson. Those guys could be mean for no reason whatsover. I've already interviewed Shannon Briggs and he's a good guy. I'd also like to interview someone like Holyfield. He's a nice guy and we could discuss the power of Jesus together. Sonny Liston was mean too but he was nice to the few reporters he liked. I wish I could have talked to him too. I think he'd be happy to know that he's finally getting his due nowadays, at least in the minds of boxing historians and fans.

Oh, Ann Wolfe scares me too. I wouldn't want to ask her the wrong thing, either.
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