Boxing training for strength, speed, and a little bit of size

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Boxing training for strength, speed, and a little bit of size

KB50MJ
I recently got into boxing and I've been trying to find ways to improve my strength and speed, but at the same time put on about 15-20 more lbs of muscle and get to about 190 in lean muscle mass (my current lean muscle mass is at 170). Because I want to be in really good shape (12% bodyfat) and still be considered a heavyweight.

So I looked up the workout routine for mike tyson back in his prime (early through late 80's) and I made my own little adjustments and added in a little bit more things into it.

What do you guys think?

Now with this workout program, could I increase size, strength, and hand speed? or would I have to add heavy weight lifting to this program? And also remember that this is with a high calorie, high carb, high protein mass gaining diet.
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Mon-Sat.

5am: 3 mile run
- Stretch and do a few squat jumps.

At least 3 hours later, or the next available time: Do bag work.
- Shadow boxing in the Peek-a-boo stance(hands high and close), bobbing and weaving using a lot of head work and foot work for 5 mins. Then do another 5 mins with a 10-25 lb. weight.

- Jump-rope for 10 mins

- Speed-bag for 10 mins

- Then work on all bags and stations in the boxing room for 2 hours, practicing combinations. (heavy bag, weighted heavy bag, slip bag, Tear-drop bag, wall punching station, etc.)

- After do 30 mins of high intensity stationary-bike work with maximum resistance

An hour or 2 later (depending on what the time is): Calisthenics/ light weights
- In total try and do 10 quick circuits of 400 sit-ups; 300-500 dips; 300 press-ups; 500 shrugs with a 30kg barbell, 300 bent over rows with just the bar, 300 shoulder presses with just the bar, 300 barbell curls with just the bar, and 10 mins of neck exercises. All with 3 min rest between each round.

- each one of the 10 circuits will consist of at least 40 sit-ups, then 30-40 dips, then 30 press-ups, then 30 bent over rows, then 25-40 dips, then 30 barbell curls, then 30 shoulder press, then 50 shrugs. Then when 10 rounds are up do 10 mins of Lying Face Up/Face Down Plate Neck Resistance.

An hour and a half later: 30 more mins on a stationary bike with maximum resistance
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Sun.

5am: 3 mile run
- Stretch and do a few squat jumps.
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Re: Boxing training for strength, speed, and a little bit of size

Duggerman
Administrator
Hmmm....I'm not an expert on this, but I'm sure someone else will chime in eventually.

Did Tyson do a similar routine every day Monday-Saturday? Wow.
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Re: Boxing training for strength, speed, and a little bit of size

KB50MJ
Yup. This was tyson's training program in the 80's
http://www.muscleprodigy.com/mike-tyson-workout-and-boxing-routine-arcl-984.html

I basically just took that routine and made some adjustments to fit my personal needs. I already have a lot of size on me so all I need to do is gain about 15 or 20 more lbs of muscle.

I'm gunna start this tomorrow and see how it turns out.
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Re: Boxing training for strength, speed, and a little bit of size

Shane
First, realize that if you ever want to compete and be good at it, you are going to have to have a real coach/trainer impart their incredible wisdom. You can't learn everything from books and the internet, although with video coaching and innovative ideas, it is easier to get feedback when you are training by yourself. At any rate, at some point, plan on spending some of your paper route dollars to invest in yourselves.

Okay, on to the good stuff.

[B]First, an overview:[/B]

[U]1.  Conditioning[/U] - is the be all and end all. If you can't last 3 minutes in the ring and can't recover in 1 minute afterwards, you have no business being there. Boxing is the ultimate workout as it covers everything - strength training, agility, aerobic capacity, anaerobic capacity, speed, and power. As such you have to train everything in a logical and well planned way - and believe it or not, it means getting enough rest as well.

Needless to say, it is a lifestyle (I learned that from Dr. Phil :good)

[U]2.  Boxing skills[/U] - you have to develop the necessary skills to carry with you into the ring and that means practicising drills and perfecting them. It means understanding why you are throwing a jab before a right cross or why you slip to the outside. You have to learn the proper mechanics and the proper defense. In combat, your brain will shut down and your body will rely on what it has been taught in those drill sessions. Battle inoculation is the term - you come prepared with a game plan and rely on your training to take you to the finish.

[U]3.  Nutrition[/U] - all the exercise in the world is not going to get you in peak physical shape. The fuel you put in your body is going to be directly related to the results you get from your training. Everytime you raise your hand to your mouth you are making a choice - ensure it is the right one.

I've seen a lot of advice given in this forum about eating 5-6 times a day, eating a tonne of protein, eating a tonne of carbs, no carbs, no protein, yadda yadda yadda. The truth is, human bodies are not all that different. If you are eating more calories than you are using for energy, you put on weight. If you are eating less, you lose weight. How those extra calories are stored (as fat or muscle) depends on other factors. Basically though, one can predict how much of each nutrient - vitamins, proteins, carbs, and fat (yes FAT) one should be eating.

[U]4.  Planning[/U] - Implementing a complete boxing routine requires some serious thought on your part. You have to plan numerous workouts, devise an efficient meal plan, ensure you are getting plenty of rest, learning the trade, and fit a life in there. Time management is crucial. If self discipline is not your strong point, do not think for a second you can dream your way to the Contender. You have to make a lot of sacrifices that I feel are well worth it in the long run.

Here is a very basic beginner program. It is suitable for someone who has no boxing experience and no exercise experience. As for equipment, if you want to learn to box - you need (at minimum) - heavy bag, bag gloves, hand wraps, and a skipping rope. You can start everything else with your bodyweight.

[B]Strength Training[/B]
Frequency: 5 times per week - eg... Workout A (M, W, F), Workout B (T, Th)
Sets: As indicated
Reps: Indicated
Weight:  Bodyweight

[U]Workout A:[/U]
Pushups - 25, 25, 25
Pullups - 10, 10, 10
Diamond Pushups - 15, 15, 15
Wide Pushups - 15, 15, 15
Chinups - 10, 10, 10
Mountain Climbers - 20 each leg

[U]Workout B:[/U]
Squats - 100, 75, 65
Lunges - 100 each leg
Standing Calf Raises - to failure, to failure, to failure (could take a while)
Wall Sit (back against a wall, legs at 90 degrees) to failure, to failure, to failure
Burpees - 20, 20, 20

[B]For Speed and Explosiveness[/B]
Plyometrics (Very Basic Routine)
Frequency:  twice a week (not on same days as Workout B - Strength Training)

Squat Jumps - 10, 10, 10
Bounding - 50metres, 50 metres
One legged hops - 20 metres frontwards, 20 metres backwards (both legs)
Clap Pushups - to fail, to fail, to fail
Step Jumps - 30, 20, 10 (get something about calf height and jump sideways over it)

[B]Anaerobic Conditioning[/B]

Interval Training
Frequency:  3 times per week (eg. M, W, F)

Pick a start line and mark off increments of 25 metres up to 400 metres. If you have a road with telephone poles on it, it works well as the poles are usually spaced 25 metres apart.

From the start line, sprint as fast as you can to the 25 metre mark.  Stop, turn around and walk back to the start line.
When you hit the start line, immediately sprint to the 50 metre mark.  Stop, walk back.
Do the same for 100metres, 200 metres, and 400 metres

(if you have anything left and haven't puked all over yourself, good, then work your way back down)

The idea is to push your heart rate up fast as you sprint and then return it to normal during the walk back (or at least close to it). These will hurt, I guarantee it.

[B]Aerobic Capacity:[/B]
Endurance
Frequency:  2 x per week (eg. M and Saturday)
Take a long run and by long I mean more than 45 minutes. Pick a good pace that you can comfortably run and then increase that pace as often as you can. It takes at least 15 minutes of continuous running before your aerobic system kicks in, so the first 15 minutes are a write off, after that you will begin to develop your aerobic capacity.

[B]Boxing Specific:[/B]
Frequency:  Ideally 5 times per week (2 days with a trainer and 3 on your own).
On your own - a basic routine.

1.  Warmup - Skipping - 5 rounds of 3 minutes/round, 1 minute rest in between

2.  Shadowboxing - 3 rounds of 3 minutes/round, 1 minute rest in between.
1st round - focus on footwork
2nd round - add a jab to your footwork
3rd round - do 1-2 combinations for the entire round.

3.  Heavy Bag: (all are 3 minute rounds, with 1 minute rest)
Round 1: Footwork - push the bag and move around it, get the feel for moving in a proper stance. Move with the bag, around it and against it. Become fleet footed.

Round 2: Jab to the head. Move, stick and jab. Move stick and double jab. Practice your jabs the entire round (good shoulder workout)

Round 3: 1-2 combinations - Move and jab/right cross (straight right). Make sure you move right after you throw. Think circles and angles. Switch directions.

Round 4:  1-2-3 combination - Move and jab, right cross, left hook combination (these are your basic punches).

Round 5:  Free for all - hit away

Round 6: Sprints - 1 minute of continuous punching to the head. Think speed, not power - let your hands fly as fast as you can.

If you want, add another Round but this time focus on 1 minute of power punches rather than speed. (If you are beginning, you are going to be wasted by now...)

4. Ab Work: 3 minutes - do as many reps as you can and switch exercises every 30 seconds. Repeat for another round if you can.

Basic crunches - 30 seconds
Basic situps - 30 seconds
Leg raises - 30 seconds
Bicycle - 30 seconds
Left side crunch (oblique crunches) - 30 seconds
Right side crunch (oblique crunches) - 30 seconds

5.  Neck Exercises - Yes's and No's to failure
Yes's - lie on your back and bring your chin to chest and then back to the floor.
No's - lie on your back, lift your head about 45 degrees and then look as far left as you can, then as far right as you can, repeat until you can do no more.

[B]Nutrition[/B]

I can't possibly prescribe a meal plan that is generic enough for everyone out there - even a beginner, but understand that you need protein, you need carbs, you need some fat, and you need to eat regularly. Do not cut any of that out and make sure you are keeping hydrated.

To come up with a meal plan, you have to determine your basic metabolic rate, adjust it for your activity level and then adjust it again to reach your goals. Then you determine what balance of nutrients that number requires and then pick the foods that will give you that. - Sounds complicated and it is, but luckily there are calculators that do most of the work.

[B]Track Your Progress[/B]

You should really keep a log of your progress so you can visually see the differences in your body and abilities. This will not only motivate you to keep going, but will provide concrete evidence that all of the hard work you are putting in is leading somewhere.

[B]Summary[/B]

This was long and I apologize for that. I applaud anyone interested in getting started. Stick with it and you will reap great rewards. Evangelize the sport - boxing needs you.

If you have questions, feel free to post them, I'll try and frequent more to answer.

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Re: Boxing training for strength, speed, and a little bit of size

Zorro
In reply to this post by KB50MJ
Kurt wrote
Now with this workout program, could I increase size, strength, and hand speed? or would I have to add heavy weight lifting to this program? And also remember that this is with a high calorie, high carb, high protein mass gaining diet.
I would add weight lifting, but don't push yourself too hard. Sparring is probably the most important thing for you to do, in all honesty. There's lots of strong boxers who can't fight.

Nice to meet you, Kurt. Upload an avatar. :)
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Re: Boxing training for strength, speed, and a little bit of size

49-0
In reply to this post by KB50MJ
Sometimes size and speed isn't everything. Conditioning and stamina are just as if not more important.
Zorro proved a good point when he said not everybody strong as an ox can fight. For example, Mike Tyson was bigger, stronger and quicker than Rocky Marciano but Rocky was the tougher, more durable fighter because of his endurance. He would run 12 miles while his opponent only ran 6. George Foreman also was strong and tough but tired after a few rounds.

Everything you're doing looks great Kurt, but remember to pace yourself and spar. Be mentally tough, too, which is one thing that Mike Tyson wasn't. If you were still standing after three rounds, he lost confidence in himself and got beat.
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Re: Boxing training for strength, speed, and a little bit of size

Duggerman
Administrator
In reply to this post by KB50MJ
Also Kurt, I remember Joe Louis saying in his autobiography that his trainer Jack Blackburn had him catching flies to improve his hand speed. I don't know if you've seen Joe Louis fight, but, like Mike Tyson, he's the only boxer who had lightning quick speed and dynamite power. I honestly can't tell you who was quicker between the two. Normally quick boxers lack power, and the strong ones lack speed, but Tyson and Louis were the only two who were masters in each category.

I know this might sound like some funky kung-fu technique, and I know it's cold where you are, but see if your hands are quick enough to capture any flies.

Here is a clip of some Joe Louis knockouts.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K3PpR12yaRs&feature=related
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Re: Boxing training for strength, speed, and a little bit of size

KB50MJ
In reply to this post by Shane
Thanks everyone for your insight.

And to answer Redemption's post. wow, that's a lot of info. Thanks. but I'm very familiar with the weight room. I've been bodybuilding for about a year now and I've packed on about 20-30 lbs of muscle. I know everything there is to know about lifting weights, nutrition, and training to get big and muscular. But I'm new to the whole boxing training and how I should go about it.

So basically what I did was, I planed everything out so I can master what I need to master for the boxing style I want to use (like the peek-a-boo style that tyson used). Because most guys in the heavyweight division are over 6'2 and I'm only 6'. So for the most part I'm gunna be fighting people taller than me, so this will work just fine. And I designed my workouts with nothing but calisthenics like Mike did back in the day, and added some light weights as well so I can train all them muscles so I have a complete body.

So basically I've been studying tyson's fights and training videos to learn what I can on my own. ANd the beauty of it all is that I live in Beacon NY. Which is about an hour and 15 mins away from the Cus D'Amato gym in the Catskills where Mike started out and trained. So when I get enough money to commute there, I'm gunna drive up there about 3 times a week and train with the trainer there. I've actually went up there and trained with the trainer for a few days back in april.

But for now I'm going to work with what I can. My local Gold's Gym has a fully equipped boxing room. So thats where I'm gunna train for now.
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Re: Boxing training for strength, speed, and a little bit of size

Duggerman
Administrator
Kurt, are you familiar with Floyd Patterson? He was trained by Cus D'Amato during the 50s, and used the same peek-a-boo techniques. His hands were even quicker than Tyson's, and he knocked out a lot of people. Here are some of his knockout highlights. He looks and fights just like a smaller Tyson.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1Pq6RmpgaA
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Re: Boxing training for strength, speed, and a little bit of size

KB50MJ
Yes I've heard of him. He kinda reminds me a lot of tyson ins some of the clips. Its crazy how fast the both of them were. Do you think it comes to them naturally or do you think its something they had to train hard for?
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Re: Boxing training for strength, speed, and a little bit of size

Maximillian
I think floyd was faster than Mike because he was smaller. Floyd was only 194 pounds and wouldn't be a heavyweight today...he'd be a cruiserweight. Mike Tyson had the natural ability, but it was Cus D'Amato, Teddy Atlas and Kevin Rooney who improved his balance, leverage, techniques, accuracy and all that. They tuned him up for sure. For the record, I think Floyd used the peek-a-boo much better than Mike Tyson. Mike Tyson could only use it fighting forward but Floyd was more versatile with it. We have a thread on it here. I believe the title is "peek-a-boo."




GIFSoup
"Take that, Big George!! I'mma BAAAD MAAN!! I shook up the world!!! I'm pretty!!!!"
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Re: Boxing training for strength, speed, and a little bit of size

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Re: Boxing training for strength, speed, and a little bit of size

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Re: Boxing training for strength, speed, and a little bit of size

KB50MJ
Yea i get what your saying. I have similar measurements. I have a 8 inch wrist and a 9 inch ankle. 13 inch fist and 27 inch thighs. But im at about 21% bodyfat. But i dont know about how good tysons measurments were. Because i saw a video on the web and it showed his wrist measurement and i could see the numbers and it looked more like 7 1/2 or 7 3/4. I think with those tale of the tape numbers they round numbers off. But thats just my opinion.

But yea all my measurments are the same as tysons except for the neck and maybe the ankle. Id have to look into that. I have really big hands and feet for my size. I wear a size 14 shoe and im only 5'11 1/2. I have a friend whos 6'4 and my hands and feet are as big as he is.

I gain muscle pretty easily and so does my brother.
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Re: Boxing training for strength, speed, and a little bit of size

KB50MJ
And going back to the ankle thing it all depends on where they did it. If i do it at the foot its 9 but if i move it up just and inch and its 11. So depending on who measured and where.
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Re: Boxing training for strength, speed, and a little bit of size

KB50MJ
Well i weigh 235 lbs at 21% body fat. I used a BMI machine at my gym and it says i have 184 LBM so thats only 6 lbs away from tyson. But ive only been training for about 2 years. And i stopped training for size over a year ago. Since then ive just been trying to get stonger but maintain my weight. But now its just basic calisthenics and weighted squats. And ive already started to gain a little again.

Also my brother has the same bone structure at i do and hes at 210 but at around 12% bodyfat. So i mean it all depends.
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Re: Boxing training for strength, speed, and a little bit of size

KB50MJ
Yea i do. Haha. The first year i started training within the first few months people thought i was on steriods because of how much size i put on so quickly. I have a friend who has trained for 6 years and he gave me all these tips on training and nutrition. So ive been training the proper way since the start. And i would be a lot bigger now if if i didnt stop lifting a year ago.
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