Favorite Boxing Style?

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Favorite Boxing Style?

Duggerman
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This post was updated on .
There are several different types of boxers. These styles work well against some opponents but not against others. That's why they say "styles make fights." I'm generalizing here, but some guys have elements of their styles that can fall into two categories. For example, Sonny Liston is more of a brawler, but used his jab or left hook to set up many of his knockouts. Therefore, some guys are listed in more than one category.

Inside Fighter--These are the guys like Joe Frazier or Mike Tyson. These men are generally short and stocky. They fight crouching low. They get in close by bobbing and weaving to slip your jab and other punches, and then they attack you in close range with hooks and uppercuts to the body and the head. They force you backward, cut the ring and corner you against the ropes. It's tough surviving against swarming brawlers because they stay in your face and don't let up. Pressure, Pressure, Pressure.

Examples: Joe Frazier, Mike Tyson (1985-88) Rocky Marciano, Jack Dempsey, David Tua, George Chuvalo, Henry Armstrong, Jake LaMatta

Outside Fighter--The opposite of the in-fighter. These guys are tall and use their jab and reach to keep their opponent from getting close. When an opponent gets in close range, the outside fighter may drop a big right hand, uppercut or flurry before moving or "dancing" out of harm's reach. While in control, they sometimes use flashy moves to excite the crowd. Because they don't throw big knockout punches like hooks and uppercuts often, outside fighters generally win on points by scoring with their jab and maintaining ring generalship, although several outside fighters have notable knockout records. Outside fighters move quickly around the ring and try not to get pinned down.

Examples: Muhammad Ali, Sugar Ray Leonard, Larry Holmes, Wladimir Klitschko, Buster Douglas (Against Tyson) Primo Carnera, Gene Tunney, Jimmy Ellis

Counterpuncher-- These intelligent and patient fighters are more defense orientated. They wait for openings and then attack. Make one small mistake against a counter-puncher and you'll find yourself on the canvas.

Examples: Archie Moore, Evander Holyfield, Jerry Quarry, Ezzard Charles, Floyd Patterson, Ken Norton, Chris Bryd, Max Schmeling, Jess Willard, Jersey Joe Walcott, Jack Johnson, Oliver McCall

The Brawlers--The men who come to beat your ass. Plain and simple. They come in there to throw big wallops. No science, no finess. All they bring is huge power. They generally end fights early but are vulnerable to counter-punchers.

Examples--Butterbean, George Foreman (1968-1977), Ray Mercer, Tony Galento, Mike Tyson, (1988-2005) Earnie Shavers, Max Baer, Bert Cooper

Boxer-Puncher--The men who can do it all. Boxer-Punchers are the guys that have the skill of the "classic boxer" but can mix it up and brawl when they need to. They can fight inside, outbox you from the distance or go to war. Boxer-Punchers are the most talented boxers of all time because they can cover all ground.

Examples: Lennox Lewis, Joe Louis, Vitali Klitschko, George Foreman (1988-1997) Tommy Hearns, Evander Holyfield, Sonny Liston, Ike Ibeabuchi, Riddick Bowe (1992)

Classic Boxer--The basic textbook type of fighter. They don't scurry around the ring like an outside fighter but they rely on the jab and counter with big rights. Classic boxers are generally "less exciting."

Examples: Jimmy Braddock, Tommy Farr, Vitali Klitschko, Pinklon Thomas, Frank Bruno


My favorite style is that of the inside fighters. I've always enjoyed the little guys with the big punch. They put in 3 minutes of work in each round and score exciting knockouts. I also have a lot of respect for the Boxer-Punchers because they can adapt to anything.






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Re: Favorite Boxing Style?

49-0
Sweet thread!!

The interesting thing about counterpunchers is that they can use any style they like but their focus is on exposing your mistakes. Floyd Patterson bobbed and weaved like a swarmer but didn't apply intense pressure like the others. Leave one opening and he'd bulldoze you. Tyson scared you into making mistakes but Floyd was more patient.

Every fighter of each category could counterpunch. Rocky Marciano counterpunched Joe Walcott to win the title in 1952. He countered Joe's right hand with his own.


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Re: Favorite Boxing Style?

Big Red
I like Muhammad Ali's style the best. No one comes near him. Who else can dance, rhyme, shuffle, tear you up with the fastest jab in history and predict the round he beats you in? Greatest of all time.

I agree that the inside fighters and brawlers can be exciting too but they're one dimensional.
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Re: Favorite Boxing Style?

Shane
It's hard to categorize what George Foreman was during his comeback. He used the jab to force you backward and set up combinations the way he did Michael Moorer. But he could fight better on the inside because he shortened up his punches. I guess boxer-puncher is correct but Ike Ibeabuchi, Joe Louis and Lennox Lewis would have killed that version of Big George.

I like to say that George was a more patient and wiser version of Sonny Liston in his second career; more of a cold blooded killer than the animal he was in his youth.
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Re: Favorite Boxing Style?

Duggerman
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In reply to this post by 49-0
49-0 wrote

Every fighter of each category could counterpunch.
Yep. Remember when Ali knocked out Liston with the "phantom punch?" He threw his right when Liston was off balance lunging in with a big left hook. That's the perfect example of a counter-punch.

The swarming inside fighters counter really well, too. One mistake and they get inside and counter with thunder, usually with hooks or uppercuts.
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Re: Favorite Boxing Style?

Zorro
I like the boxer-punchers like Joe Louis and Lennox Lewis. Nothing they can't do and they land some big bombs.
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Re: Favorite Boxing Style?

Duggerman
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In reply to this post by Duggerman
The cool thing about it is that no style is full proof against all others. I'll list some examples.

Outside-fighters generally don't do well against swarming inside-fighters because the swarmers get in close, and fight at a vicious pace, making the out-fighter uncomfortable. Watch Joe Frazier hunt down and destroy outside fighters like Muhammad Ali, Jimmy Ellis and Bob Foster.

Inside fighters are sometimes vulnerable to brawlers because they put themselves in range to get slaughtered. Frazier getting wiped out by Foreman is one example.

Brawlers are typically outmaneuvered by counter-punchers. Examples are Muhammad Ali twice upsetting Sonny Liston and Evander Holyfield knocking out Bert Cooper. Then again, there are always exceptions, like Norton getting KO'd by Foreman and Patterson getting destroyed by Liston.

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Re: Favorite Boxing Style?

Evolution
In reply to this post by Duggerman
I was more of the "classic boxer." I threw a constant jab and got aggressive with my right cross. I don't have the "sexy moves" of an Ali and prefer not to skip around the ring. I prefer to stand in there and fight, setting things up with the jab. Perhaps this is why I didn't make it far as an amatuer. Well, that and I had a sad record.

I had the most problems with counterpunchers and boxer punchers. The only swarmer I tangled with was David Tua and he wasn't real aggressive by the time I got to him. Every punch hurt plenty though.
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Re: Favorite Boxing Style?

Big Red
Who was the best inside fighter?
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Re: Favorite Boxing Style?

Evan Fields
Computer Blue wrote
Who was the best inside fighter?
James Toney and Bernard Hopkins are two of the best we've seen in that department in the last 20 years.

Joe Louis was great on the inside as well. I like how he managed to make enough rooms to throw his crisps combinations of short punches. A master really. You may look at his first fight against Buddy Baer and look at two specific things : how he handles Baer's arms in clinches and how he actually gets on the inside.

Marciano basically spent his career within one feet of his opponent... and got away with the victory each time.

Every time I watch Pernell Whitaker, I'm surprised at how good he was on the inside. His body punches were great for someone with his power. Great technique overall.

I'll throw some other obvious names out there : Jack Dempsey, Joe Frazier...
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Re: Favorite Boxing Style?

Duggerman
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The best inside fighter I've seen was Henry Armstrong. He stayed on you and punched and punched and punched. With the exception of Frazier and Marciano, no one applied more pressure.

Best outside fighter was Muhammad Ali. No other fighter had legs as swift as Ali. He could float and pummel you from the distance but it was difficult to return anything.

Best counter-puncher might be Jack Johnson. His entire style was built around punishing you for your sins.

Best brawler was George Foreman. Sure he ran out of gas but would you last long enough to take advantage?

Best boxer-puncher was Lennox Lewis. If he had a chin like Ali he would have been unbeatable.

Best classic boxer? Not quite sure at the moment. I need to think it over.

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Re: Favorite Boxing Style?

Rosco
I think there's a difference between a swarmer and pressure fighter.

A swarmer, is a fighter that attacks immediatly, all offense and little regard for defense. His objective is to overwhelm his opponent with the sheer aggressiveness of his assualt. and the high number of puches landed. Ray Mancini might be a good example of this style.

A pressure fighter is one who stays in front of his oponent and keeps moving forward, never letting his opponent dictate the style, and always looking to make his opponent pay for any mistake or weakness. The pressure fighter may or may not throw a large volume of punches, but will attack any opening, occasionally exposing himself in order to deliver a punch. Roberto Duran is an excellent example of a pressure fighter.

The primary difference IMO, is that the pressure fighter is more controlled and more calculating, looking to expose weakness, where a "swarmer" seeks instead to create a weakness.
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Re: Favorite Boxing Style?

Zombies Ate Me
Rosco wrote
I think there's a difference between a swarmer and pressure fighter.

A swarmer, is a fighter that attacks immediatly, all offense and little regard for defense. His objective is to overwhelm his opponent with the sheer aggressiveness of his assualt. and the high number of puches landed. Ray Mancini might be a good example of this style.

A pressure fighter is one who stays in front of his oponent and keeps moving forward, never letting his opponent dictate the style, and always looking to make his opponent pay for any mistake or weakness. The pressure fighter may or may not throw a large volume of punches, but will attack any opening, occasionally exposing himself in order to deliver a punch. Roberto Duran is an excellent example of a pressure fighter.

The primary difference IMO, is that the pressure fighter is more controlled and more calculating, looking to expose weakness, where a "swarmer" seeks instead to create a weakness.
I always thought swarming and pressuring were one and the same?
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Re: Favorite Boxing Style?

Duggerman
Administrator
This relates perfectly to this topic. The producer backs it up with examples.
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Re: Favorite Boxing Style?

Shane
Duggerman wrote
This relates perfectly to this topic. The producer backs it up with examples.
That video proved a good point about Roy Jones Jr. It's hard to describe his style.
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Re: Favorite Boxing Style?

Duggerman
Administrator
My favorite style is still the swarmer. My second favorite is the boxer-puncher because they can do it all.
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Re: Favorite Boxing Style?

Leo the Lion
In reply to this post by Duggerman
Yo AJ! Absolutely love boxer punchers. Quite a few boxer punchers could also counter punch really well. People don't give Andrew Golota much credit, but my God he was unstoppable vs bowe. If only he just stayed focused and was mentally string he could have been a legend. He schooled and ruined bowe. Bowe was never the same after Golota. Anyone who hasn't seen that fight please watch. Boxing masterclass - inside, outside, counters, defense you name it. Amazing 2 fights.
Leo Rothmann - Amateur Boxer 183lbs
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Re: Favorite Boxing Style?

Brooklyn's Finest
Leo the Lion wrote
Yo AJ! Absolutely love boxer punchers. Quite a few boxer punchers could also counter punch really well. People don't give Andrew Golota much credit, but my God he was unstoppable vs bowe. If only he just stayed focused and was mentally string he could have been a legend. He schooled and ruined bowe. Bowe was never the same after Golota. Anyone who hasn't seen that fight please watch. Boxing masterclass - inside, outside, counters, defense you name it. Amazing 2 fights.
Bowe caught Riddick when he was out of shape and lazy. 1992 Riddick Bowe would handle Golota easily. Lennox Lewis KO'd Golota in less than one round. Golota quit after two rounds with a shot Mike Tyson.
Golota was no great fighter.
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Re: Favorite Boxing Style?

Leo the Lion
I didn't say Golota was great. I said he could have been great. Also, Golota fought seriously well vs Bowe. I recommend you rewatch those fights. Golota was a big time underachiever. Mentally weak as I mentioned. I said had he not been mentally weak who knows, because he displayed skill unlike his normal form vs Bowe. Golota was intimidated by Lennox and was so stiff - not fluid like his performance against Bowe. He wasn't the same fighter, quit vs Mike mental weakness and let himself get intimidated.
Leo Rothmann - Amateur Boxer 183lbs