I saw this movie called Shattered Glass

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Re: I saw this movie called Shattered Glass

Duggerman
Administrator
Here's a new interview with Adam Penenburg, who famously busted Stephen Glass. He talked a bit about the Stephen Glass and Jayson Blair scandals and the state of journalism/media today.
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Re: I saw this movie called Shattered Glass

Becky
He sure bugs his eyes a lot, doesn't he? lmao.
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Re: I saw this movie called Shattered Glass

Bugs
In reply to this post by Duggerman
Duggerman wrote
The Greatest wrote
Becky wrote
The novel begins at the end of "Stephen's" journalism career and follows him hiding from the press, getting handjobs in massage parlors, having nervous breakdowns, and rediscovering his jewish roots.
I've gotta pick up a copy of this book!!!!!!!
lol @ "The Greatest." I've got the book, and he walks you through how he fooled his editors and everyone else. In my opinion, it's a decent novel and I hope he writes another one.

I wrote a blog on Shattered Glass on my website a while back. I also posted two interviews with the real Stephen Glass.

http://ajdugger.weebly.com/1/post/2011/05/shattered-glass-and-all-the-presidents-men.html
Solid blog, doc. You should write a follow up about whether or not Stephen could pull off those feats today.
Eh....What's Up, Doc?
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Re: I saw this movie called Shattered Glass

Michelle
Anyone notice that when Stephen Glass got caught, his editor Chuck was applauded for catching him but when Jayson Blair got caught his editors were fired. Why is that?
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Re: I saw this movie called Shattered Glass

Becky
Michelle wrote
Anyone notice that when Stephen Glass got caught, his editor Chuck was applauded for catching him but when Jayson Blair got caught his editors were fired. Why is that?
Probably because Jayson did worse things to a degree...plagarism, fabricating, etc. The thing about Stephen was that he invented fake business cards, emails, web sites and other tools to convince people that his story sources were real. Jayson Blair did no such thing. His editors should have caught it quicker. That's my guess.
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Re: I saw this movie called Shattered Glass

Bert Sugar
In reply to this post by Michelle
Michelle wrote
Anyone notice that when Stephen Glass got caught, his editor Chuck was applauded for catching him but when Jayson Blair got caught his editors were fired. Why is that?
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Re: I saw this movie called Shattered Glass

Duggerman
Administrator
That video about Jason sums it up. One difference between he and Stephen is that Stephen had a successful internship and was an honest reporter early on. He didn't start fabricating until later in his career. Plus he was a fact checker and knew how to manipulate the system. From the looks of things, Jayson should have never been hired in the first place. And let's be honest, The New York Times is more popular and has more readers than The New Republic.
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Re: I saw this movie called Shattered Glass

Michelle
Makes a lot of sense. I don't know how papers work. I figured Chuck Lane would have been let go because of Steve. I do recall him saying that he feared for his job when the TNR scandal happened.

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Re: I saw this movie called Shattered Glass

Michelle
OMG!! Look what I found!! Look what I found!! It's a blog written by Adam Penenberg about the TNR scandal.

I first became aware of Stephen Glass when my executive editor flipped a copy of the May 18 New Republic across my desk at Forbes Digital Tool (forbes.com), pointed to a story titled "Hack Heaven," and snapped, "Why didn't you write this?"

I retreated to my desk (muttering mostly untrue obscenities about my boss's heritage and hairstyle). But after reading the story I, too, was kicking myself for having missed it.

"Hack Heaven" detailed the exploits of Ian Restil, a 15-year-old computer hacker who broke into the computer system of Jukt Micronics, "a big-time software firm" in California. Once inside, the noxious teen posted every employee's salary on the company's web site alongside some nudie pictures, each bearing the caption, "THE BIG BAD BIONIC BOY HAS BEEN HERE BABY."

Instead of calling in the Feds--which, since hacking is a federal offense, is what most companies would do--Jukt executives hired Restil to show them how to protect their systems. To ensure he got top dollar, Restil hired an agent, Joe Hiert, described in the article as "super-agent to super-nerds." The magazine article also claimed such deals--which are more like digital protection rackets than legitimate business agreements-- have stymied prosecutors and that law enforcement officials in Nevada have become so desperate to stop companies from hiring hackers that they are sponsoring a series of radio advertisements: "Would you hire a shoplifter to watch the cash register? Please don't deal with hackers."

After I finished reading the story, I was stunned. I was not familiar with this software firm, nor had I ever come across any anti-hacker public service campaigns. Glass also cited anti-hacker legislation, a hacker organization, and a law enforcement agency that was news to me. I had been scooped by an inside-the- beltway reporter--and that hurt, since covering hackers is part of my beat.

I don't normally check other reporters' work, and I certainly had no intention of acting like some journalism cop, but something wasn't right. Either I was an egregiously irresponsible reporter acting as a cyber-poseur, or Stephen Glass was.

My first step was to phone Glass and request Ian Restil's number; Glass didn't return my call. This was not surprising. If another journalist called me for a hot source, I wouldn't be inclined to pony up either. I also emailed sections of Glass's story to some hacker contacts and plugged Jukt Micronics into several search engines. When I couldn't find a web site, I knew something was wrong. What "big-time" software company didn't have a web presence in 1998?

I then tried to find Jukt the old-fashioned way, by calling operators in each of California's 15 area codes, plus the 800 and 888 toll-free exchanges. But there was no listing of Jukt Micronics in the state of California. I checked with the Software Publishers Association of America, the California Secretary of State business filings department, and the state tax franchise board. There was no record of Jukt Micronics.

I opened email from my hacker contacts, and for a change they all agreed: the New Republic story was a "fraud," "B.S.," "If there are hacker agents then I'm a Spice Girl," and "Another example of a capitalist media publication hyping the hacker menace." A few minutes later, a Lexis-Nexis database search turned up only one reference to Jukt Micronics: Glass's New Republic story.

Sometimes it's hard enough just to check facts. It can take half a dozen phone calls to confirm one nugget of information, but once you verify it, you've done your job. To prove something or someone doesn't exist is much more challenging: every time you strike out means another query, another phone call, another wasted hour poking around databases or the internet. I wondered if I published a story that debunked the existence of Jukt Micronics if I could be leaving myself open to potential trouble, possibly even a libel or slander suit. Was it possible that some pimply-faced 20-something running his own startup called Jukt Micronics out of his parents' garage would read my story, then come out of the digital woodwork?

I spent the next day and a half trying to confirm one fact--any fact--in the whole story. But law enforcement officials from Nevada's attorney general's office, the state highway patrol, and the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Force claimed they had never financed any anti-hacker public service campaigns. I also called editors at the state's two biggest daily newspapers and top four radio stations but came up with dead air.

I contacted officials from the FBI, the Justice Department, U.S. customs departments, and police departments in California and New Hampshire (both aggressive cybercrime fighters), and no one had heard of any organization, law, or government agency mentioned in the article. If, as Glass reported, 21 states were considering versions of the "Uniform Computer Security Act," which would criminalize immunity deals between hackers and companies, the Chicago-based National Conference of Commissions on Uniform State Laws had no knowledge of it.

Finally, I phoned Charles Lane, the New Republic's top editor. I told him I had serious questions about "Hack Heaven" and was considering doing my own story on it. Lane told me he would look into it. Two hours later he called back. "Here's a number," he said. "Tell me what you think."

A 650 area code, Silicon Valley, a generic voice mail greeting: "You have reached the offices of Jukt Micronics. Please leave a message."

Two and a half days of hard-core research, of being convinced that Jukt Micronics was merely a fantasy, and I was getting the companypis voice mail? I simply couldnpit believe it. I grabbed a colleague of mine, and each time we simultaneously dialed Jukt one of us would get a busy signal. This was suspicious. How many software companies have only one line into its switchboard? I then called Pac Bell and asked an operator whether the Jukt number was listed as business or residential. It was a cell phone.

The following morning, with Lane's cooperation, we set up a speakerphone interview to interrogate Glass, who had never returned my call. Under intense pressure he coughed up a number of sources, including the address for a Jukt Micronics site on AOL and email addresses for Ian Restil and the hacker agent, as well as a number of phone numbers. He claimed he had received business cards at a hacker conference in Bethesda, Maryland, from the contacts he cited in his story, but admitted he had not verified any of their information.

There were two possibilities. Either Glass had been duped by hackers at the convention or he had faked the story.

We simply couldn't believe a journalist would create a story out of whole cloth and publish it in the New Republic. The hacker angle looked more promising, except that the AOL site was suspicious: it looked amateurish, and any hacker group that could have pulled such an elegant media hack at Jukt would never skimp on glitzy tech. We decided to hold our story until we could get to the bottom of it.

Two days later, Lane fired Glass after determining that the young associate editor had fabricated "Hack Heaven." I later learned he'd fabricated many other pieces, for a number of publications. In fact, Glass had made up in whole or in part some two dozen stories for the New Republic alone, as well as articles for George, Rolling Stone, and Harper's, among others.

The New Republic fact checkers, understandably, came under a lot of heat over Glass's fabrications, but I believe the real problem is an editorial one. Forbes Digital Tool employs no fact checkers, but if Glass had filed "Hack Heaven" with one of our editors, he wouldn't have gotten far before running into serious questions: What city is Jukt Micronics based in? Is it public or private? What kind of software does the company make? Why haven't we heard of this "big-time" software firm?

This was a summer of journalism firings and resignations. In addition to Glass, two columnists at the Boston Globe, Patricia Smith and Mike Barnicle, were forced to resign, and two CNN producers were fired and one resigned as a result of an unsubstantiated story on nerve gas on NewsStand: CNN & TIME. And just the other day, I debunked a New York Post reporter's story that claimed the mob was moving into high-tech scams.

There is intense pressure today on reporters to produce sexy stories. This is what sells newspapers and magazines, and attracts traffic to web-based news sites. However, I think reporters can be challenged by that pressure to produce material the public will read, without having to fabricate it. In some ways it's the kind of intellectual challenge that Reed is known for, and it translates well to the journalism profession. Which is why I see so many classmates out there pounding beats--Peter Goodman '89, a staff reporter at the Washington Post; Will Bourne '88, an editor at Fortune; Kevin Kelleher '85, who works for the San Francisco bureau of Thestreet.com; and Chris Lydgate '90 and Kurt Opprecht '85, who both earn their living as freelancers. What you won't find any of them doing is fabricating stories.


http://www.reed.edu/reed_magazine/nov1998/truth/index.html
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Re: I saw this movie called Shattered Glass

Duggerman
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^^I've read that before. It is interesting to re-live the entire incident through Adam's eyes. He went into great detail on this. Great writer.

I think it's safe to say that the conference call is what ultimately did Stephen in. Chuck Lane said in the commentary on the DVD that when Forbes assumed Steve had been duped, Steve let them assume that because sometimes journalists get duped. If you get duped, you won't be severely punished because it's not your fault.

But Chuck could see how nervous and sweaty Steve was as he was questioned. The Forbes staff couldn't see that. It was all downhill after that call. That's when Lane made up his mind that Steve was a liar.
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Re: I saw this movie called Shattered Glass

Jessica
Duggerman wrote
^^I've read that before. It is interesting to re-live the entire incident through Adam's eyes. He went into great detail on this. Great writer.

I think it's safe to say that the conference call is what ultimately did Stephen in. Chuck Lane said in the commentary on the DVD that when Forbes assumed Steve had been duped, Steve let them assume that because sometimes journalists get duped. If you get duped, you won't be severely punished because it's not your fault.

But Chuck could see how nervous and sweaty Steve was as he was questioned. The Forbes staff couldn't see that. It was all downhill after that call. That's when Lane made up his mind that Steve was a liar.
I thought it was the press conference location that sealed the deal for Lane?
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Re: I saw this movie called Shattered Glass

Duggerman
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Naw. Lane said in the commentary that he long suspected Steve was lying but was giving him chances to prove him wrong. When he watched Steve's sweaty reaction to the interrogation he knew the guy was lying. Discovering that Steve was never at the press conference only confirmed his suspicions. When he discovered his brother posed as George Sims, that when he knew beyond all doubt that Steve fabricated the entire article. But you could say that the conference call was the beginning of the end.
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Re: I saw this movie called Shattered Glass

Michelle
They Met???????

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Re: I saw this movie called Shattered Glass

Becky
In reply to this post by Duggerman
Duggerman wrote
Naw. Lane said in the commentary that he long suspected Steve was lying but was giving him chances to prove him wrong. When he watched Steve's sweaty reaction to the interrogation he knew the guy was lying. Discovering that Steve was never at the press conference only confirmed his suspicions. When he discovered his brother posed as George Sims, that when he knew beyond all doubt that Steve fabricated the entire article. But you could say that the conference call was the beginning of the end.
Chuck said the same thing in this interview.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=75nelHN3K7c

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1TMfc0gs1kA

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JC2mpjYqOio


Michelle wrote
They Met???????

At first I thought this was photoshop. Stephen and Jayson casually having a beer? Yeah right. But it looks like they actually did a joint interview with a reporter. Who knew?
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Re: I saw this movie called Shattered Glass

Left Hook From Hell...
In reply to this post by Michelle
Michelle wrote
They Met???????

The Bad Boyz of Journalism. I took a journalism class in high school and we watched the movie about Stephen Glass.
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Re: I saw this movie called Shattered Glass

Alexander
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Re: I saw this movie called Shattered Glass

Entaowed
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Re: I saw this movie called Shattered Glass

Entaowed
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Re: I saw this movie called Shattered Glass

Duggerman
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Entaowed wrote
However, is it possible that he pretended remorse, including crying on those shoulders while continuing the lies?  He has received a 6 figure advance on his book, is he just willing to do or say anything to succeed?  If forced to choose i would say no, but I also tend to be believing...

One thing that stayed with me is that while he made up the vast majority of characters too, & went to significant links to fake whole events, identities, groups, web sites...Look at what he did with Vernon Jordan.  He admitted inventing lecherous conduct by an innocent man.
Does he feel badly about fabricating something that could be highly damaging to the man's career?

It does seem unlikely, though not highly, that he went through all that time in therapy just faking contrition & self-discovery.  

I hope he is not a Monster.  All I can say is more likely than not he is honest now.
People said he was a great manipulator. Not sure if his remorse when he got caught was genuine or not. I read that he wrote several apology letters to people he hurt, including Vernon Jordan. A lot of his stories were stereotypical...things you were prepared to read.

I think he's truly changed for the better now. A lot of people have defended him and this fiasco happened so long ago now. But it's going to haunt him forever. Sad. With his imagination he could have been a good screenwriter perhaps.
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Re: I saw this movie called Shattered Glass

Left Hook From Hell...
In reply to this post by Entaowed
Stephen had quite the imagination didn't he? He should get his journalism license back and write for the onion.
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