Tempers and Emotional Problems: Good for boxers?

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Tempers and Emotional Problems: Good for boxers?

Phantom Punch
I wrote in another thread about how Sonny Liston's temper was great for him in the ring but bad for him outside of it, like when he knocked out police officers. Overall do you think anger is good for boxers or could anger work against them in the ring somehow?
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Re: Tempers and Emotional Problems: Good for boxers?

redfeng007
This post was updated on .
I believe it will give more problems

Anger works against boxers most of the times.

Boxers became very reckless without thinking.

Boxers may get stronger for a while, but they would gas out faster.

Opponent would take charge of the fight much easier, seeing an angry boxer became reckless.

But if an angry boxer knowing how to plan his attack, it will be a different case.



An angry Ike Ibeabuchi finished the slick Chris Byrd off, despite being frustrated.



I can tell Chris Byrd was pissing him off...


I believed Joe Louis was very angry from that knockdown...



In return, he paid him back with this...

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Re: Tempers and Emotional Problems: Good for boxers?

It's Dale
I think that anger can be a wonderful tool in the ring as long as its channeled right. George Foreman, Sonny Liston and Mike Tyson were young angry men who used their emotions to devastate opponents.

Of all boxers I think Joe Louis was the angriest overall. He kept cool on the outside and rarely showed any emotion in the ring but behind that stoic expression was a man full of rage. Look at the racist conditions he had to endure every day of his life. Jack Johnson had things worse but I don't think it bothered him as much as it bothered Joe. Joe was hurt by those conditions but remained cool in the ring.
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Re: Tempers and Emotional Problems: Good for boxers?

Duggerman
Administrator
Most people agree that Joe Frazier's best performance was against Muhammad Ali in 1971. The Fight of The Century. I agree but disagree all at once. He was angry with Ali in that fight and made reckless decisions he didn't make in other fights. He looked slicker against Ellis and Foster. His anger certainly helped him regarding his will to destroy Ali and win the fight, but he looked reckless a few times in there. Hurting Ali was the name of the game, even if it meant he'd take unnessesary punishment himself.
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Re: Tempers and Emotional Problems: Good for boxers?

Brooklyn's Finest
Ann Wolfe is pure rage too. I met her several times. But she keeps it in check and channels it in the ring. Mike Tyson does this too. One time he was mad at Kevin Rooney and it was my time to spar with him. I was like "Oh shit Kevin. Don't make him mad!" And sure enough Mike beat the shit out of me that day, more brutal than usual. He cracked a rib with a left hook. I'll never forget it. My doctor asked for an autograph when he found out Mike Tyson cracked my rib. lol.
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Re: Tempers and Emotional Problems: Good for boxers?

Phantom Punch
Man I forgot about Ann Wolfe. She's the most angry person I've ever seen!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4LXcv2C-CDQ
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Re: Tempers and Emotional Problems: Good for boxers?

Friday The 13th...
When you're mad you don't think. This is why the thinking boxers were always the best, like Robinson, Ali, Holmes, Leonard, etc. Good points about Joe Louis but his rage was channeled nicely. It wasn't until someone hurt him that he got mad and even then, it was calculated in the way he took you out.
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Re: Tempers and Emotional Problems: Good for boxers?

Evolution
Friday The 13th... wrote
When you're mad you don't think. This is why the thinking boxers were always the best, like Robinson, Ali, Holmes, Leonard, etc. Good points about Joe Louis but his rage was channeled nicely. It wasn't until someone hurt him that he got mad and even then, it was calculated in the way he took you out.
This. Like football, boxing is about violence but controlled violence. When you're in a real fight and lose your temper it might last 30 seconds before you're tired. You're not thinking. It's all temporary adrenaline. Compare this to a fight when you have a gameplan, train for months and pace yourself for 12 rounds. You may not like the guy you're fighting, but you're thinking and that makes a difference.

If you have something on your mind in the ring I suggest not to waste your time training or fighting. Dave (David Tua) was having legal problems with Kevin Barry when I sparred with him and I made him look bad more often than not. The guy wasn't focused. He looked bad in training and sometimes worse in his fights.

But everyone is different. Buster Douglas lost his mom and fought one of the best fights I've ever seen in my life. I wouldn't be able to fight at all after such a tragedy. It ultimately depends on how you channel the stress. I know George Foreman used to love knocking guys out. In his early career he relied on his power. He threw angry bombs all the time, part of why his stamina was quickly depleted during those years.
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Re: Tempers and Emotional Problems: Good for boxers?

Sivul
In reply to this post by Phantom Punch
Phantom Punch wrote
I wrote in another thread about how Sonny Liston's temper was great for him in the ring but bad for him outside of it, like when he knocked out police officers. Overall do you think anger is good for boxers or could anger work against them in the ring somehow?
you could argue it was bad for him in the ring too. His frustrations against Clay got him beat up in two fights. Watch Billy Conn use Ali-esque tactics against Joe Louis in their first fight. Joe was frustrated but still calm and mature enough to bide his time waiting for the right opening and he didn't miss it when it arrived. Sonny Liston didn't have that kind of patience against Ali or any other fighter he was losing against; another reason he cheated using that blinding substance on his glove.
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Re: Tempers and Emotional Problems: Good for boxers?

Left Hook From Hell...
In reply to this post by redfeng007
redfeng007 wrote

Boxers became very reckless without thinking.
I agree. This happens in real fights too. And general. When you're mad you don't think. I think this is partially why in ALL combat sports, thinking fighters generally do better. (Ali, Bruce Lee, and the like) Brains before brawn most times.

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Re: Tempers and Emotional Problems: Good for boxers?

Rosco
Name one time Ali got mad in the ring. I can't think of a single one.
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Re: Tempers and Emotional Problems: Good for boxers?

redfeng007
This post was updated on .
His fight with Ernie Terell.

Ernie repeatedly called him 'Clay' before the fight...

Ali is



Let's make this fight more personal...



Since Ernie Terell is so special, Ali would give him bodyshots instead...



How about a little lower...


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Re: Tempers and Emotional Problems: Good for boxers?

Westmoreland
Mental illness can hurt your performance in the ring. In one of the threads here Evolution (a former sparring partner of David Tua and others) said that David wouldn't perform well when he was going through his divorce and his lawsuit with Kevin Barry. Sometimes you have stuff on your mind that can distract you.

Eddie Machen suffered from depression and eventually killed himself. He may not have ever been champion since Frazier and Liston were around (both of whom defeated him) but he may have done better if not for his depression.

Anger, sadness, or any kind of mental imbalance can hurt your ring performance, I think.
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Re: Tempers and Emotional Problems: Good for boxers?

Leo the Lion
Ali got pissed vs Chuck Wepner and blasted him out of there. Ali though, I remember just seeing this incredible focus come over him. So in a way more determination than unadulterated anger.
Leo Rothmann - Amateur Boxer 183lbs
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Re: Tempers and Emotional Problems: Good for boxers?

MAGUIRE
In reply to this post by Duggerman
Duggerman wrote
Most people agree that Joe Frazier's best performance was against Muhammad Ali in 1971. The Fight of The Century. I agree but disagree all at once. He was angry with Ali in that fight and made reckless decisions he didn't make in other fights. He looked slicker against Ellis and Foster. His anger certainly helped him regarding his will to destroy Ali and win the fight, but he looked reckless a few times in there. Hurting Ali was the name of the game, even if it meant he'd take unnessesary punishment himself.
Same thing in Maniilla. You don't fight mad.
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